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Business Visas, Family Visas, Law & Forms, Marriage Visas, Pleasure Visas, Study Visas

Where do nonimmigrant visas get their names?


Have you wondered where the visas get their names?

It’s a rather trifling matter, but the alphabetization of the nonimmigrant visa classes can create anonymity and an impersonal tone to the entire visa application process right from the beginning. Knowing where the visa names come from, and the foundation of their meaning, can make them seem less unfamiliar and less intimidating. Less intimidation means more comfort and confidence, which in turns makes your immigration experience more enjoyable and successful (we hope).

US Immigration and Customs at Shannon Airport,...

US Immigration and Customs at Shannon Airport, Ireland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The root of the visa names is based on their placement in the INA Code (that’s INA for Immigration and Nationality Act, the major piece of U.S. law governing immigration in the U.S. – for more on the INA, see this article).

Welcome to Immigration 101

As with many pieces of legal code, the INA begins with a section 101, where all the major words used in the code are defined. Not surprisingly, this section is called “Definitions“.  Going from A to Z, Section 101(1) starts with “administrator”, and by 101(38), you’re at “United States”. Unfortunately, thereafter the alphabet is lost to later add-ons, such as the ever-extensive “aggravated felony” and the ironically forgotten “stowaway”.

Actuating Anonymity by Alliteration and Alphabetization of Areas

Logo of ICE

Logo of ICE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At Section 101(15), one comes to the meaning of “immigrant”, which is defined by what it is not, rather than that which it is. Pursuant to Section 101(15), the term “immigrant” means every alien except an alien who is within one of the following classes of nonimmigrant aliens: Ambassador, temporary Business or pleasure, Continuous transit, Deckhands and crewman, trEaty traders and investors, Foreign students, Government diplomat, Highly skilled workers, International exchange program people, Karat-laden fiancées, Long-term employees of foreign companies, Mixed studies vocational and nonacademic students, Non-separated families, extraOrdinarily able people, Photogs and athletes, Qultural exchange visitors, Religious visitors, Snitches, Trafficking victims, abUse victims, and permanent Visa families. Now obviously, some of the above alphabetization requires a stretch of the imagination. But the notion is there. A through V is the list of different ways you can be a temporary visitor of the U.S. under Section 101(15)’s definition of (non)immigration.

Ambassador,

Business or pleasure,

Continuous transit,

Deckhands and crewman,

trEaty traders and investors,

Foreign students,

Government diplomat,

Highly skilled workers,

International exchange program people,

Karat-laden fiancées,

Long-term employees of foreign companies,

Mixed studies vocational and nonacademic students,

Non-separated families,

extraOrdinarily able people,

Photogs and athletes,

Qultural exchange visitors,

Religious visitors,

Snitches,

Trafficking victims,

abUse victims, and

permanent Visa families.

Most of these apply to few people, and a few of these apply to almost everybody. We hope that our breakdown helps break down the wall of anonymity behind the nonimmigrant visa titles. Considering the alliteration employed, we have to imagine that even the drafters of the legislation hoped to bring a bit of personality to the code.

Best of luck.
Miami International Attorneys, P.L.
abernhard@miapl.com
P.O. Box 191057
Miami Beach, FL 33119
Tel: 786-566-1969.

For more answers to your questions, contact MIA at abernhard@miamivisahelp.com or Miami International Attorneys at www.miamivisahelp.com.

Immigration Lawyer Miami

Miami International Attorneys, P.L.

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Visas – Info on Each Visa Available

Andrew John Bernhard, Esq.

Welcome to MiamiVisaHelp.com’s Blog!

Welcome to MiamiVisaHelp.com’s law blog … discussing everything visa from the perspective of those that have a need, desire, or tendency to move from country to country for the purpose of work, survival, education, living, play, and everything in between. Please feel free to send Andrew John Bernhard, Esq. a message! We are always trying to enhance your experience, and help all of us movers, migrators, immigrants, ex-pats and travelers have an easier, happier, and more satisfying experience in the often confusing world of U.S. Immigration. Please feel free to visit our friends at USImmigrationMiami.wordpress.com and TheMitochondrialMigrator.wordpress.com to see more from similar minded people like yourself! Most of all…ENJOY! - Andrew John Bernhard, Esq.

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